NSD - SOCIAL-DEMOCRATIE LIBERATRICE ET POPULAIRE FRANCOPHONE D'OUVERTURE, A LA RECHERCHE D'UNE MEILLEURE CREATION DE TRAVAIL. POUR LA DEFENSE DES CITOYENS, DES ENTREPRISES, ET DES MINORITES. TOUS ENSEMBLE POUR LES NOUVELLES IDEES SOCIAL-DEMOCRATES DE SOCIETE ET LA DEFENSE DES LIBERTES. LE RASSEMBLEMENT QUI INCLUT DES ECONOMISTES SOCIAUX-DEMOCRATES EST OUVERT ET LUTTE CONTRE LE JACOBINISME QUI INHIBE LES INITIATIVES COMMERCIALES ET LES EFFORTS DE LA SOCIETE.

   Nous donnons un apercu à travers un article ci-dessous, comment il est nécessaire de garantir parfois la Paix par des moyens minimum (des vedettes armées par exemple).

  Ceci aura sans doute à s'appliquer aux frontières de l'Europe future.
 
 

Japan revises N. Korea threat
Saturday, March 15, 2003 Posted: 0659 GMT ( 2:59 PM HKT)
(article original en anglais. Sources Reuter)
 
 
 

An Aegis-equipped destroyer 'Myoukou' patrolling in the Sea of Japan





OKYO, Japan -- In the face of a perceived threat from North Korea, Japan is considering bolstering its spy ship presence in the sea shared by the two countries.

A Japanese defense spokesman said the country may boost the number of missile-detecting destroyers deployed near North Korea from one to three amid jitters over a possible ballistic missile launch by Pyongyang, Kyodo News Agency said.

As concerns mount over the threat North Korea poses to East Asia, Japan says it is considering upping its missile defense systems.

"There is no point in having the Aegis ships, each costing more than 100 billion yen ($850 million), if they are not brought to the Sea of Japan at a time when Japan's national security is being threatened by North Korea," the agency on Friday quoted a government official as saying.

Japan has four 7,250-tonne ships equipped with the state-of-the-art Aegis radar system, which is capable of detecting more than 2,000 aircraft or missiles several hundred km (miles) away.

One ship was already deployed in the Sea of Japan (or East Sea as it is also known) between Japan and North Korea on what Tokyo has described as a regular patrol.

The agency said the latest moves would raise the state of alert against communist North Korea to one of its highest levels ever.

The Yomiuri Shimbun daily also reported that Tokyo plans to buy advanced U.S.-made Patriot anti-missile rockets to deploy from July.

The report came as the U.S. Air Force prepared to resume spy flights off the coast of North Korea amid an escalating standoff with Pyongyang over its nuclear ambitions.

The deadlock began in October when the U.S. said Pyongyang admitted to secretly pursuing nuclear weapons and has worsened ever since, with North Korea reactivating nuclear facilities frozen under a 1994 pact with Washington, and kicking out inspectors.

Pyongyang test fired a short-range missile on Monday, its second test in as many weeks and the first series of launches since it shocked the world in 1998 by sending a long range Taepodong missile over Japan's main island.

Missile plan

In recent days, Japanese media reports have said Pyongyang could soon test-fire a missile that could reach Japan.

But under the new missile defense plan being considered, if North Korea fired a mid-range Rodong missile at Japan, Tokyo would be able to intercept it with an enhanced version of the Patriot PAC2, the Yomiuri report said.

Those Patriots would be able to intercept ballistic missiles with a range of 1,000 kilometers (620 miles).

At the moment Japan has less advanced Patriot anti-missile rockets in place at 27 locations around the country, but they have a shorter range.

To be able to respond to any missile, Tokyo is also considering revising the law to enable the military to launch a Patriot rocket before being given orders to do so by the prime minister, the Yomiuri added.

Japanese law keeps strict civilian control over its military, a product of the caution that remains following Japan's militarism that led to its crushing defeat in World War II.

Tokyo may also allow its military to mobilize immediately in the event a missile lands in Japanese territory, the Yomiuri said, but did not give further details.

Japan's defense chief said Tokyo is also focusing on being able to spot when a missile might be fired, before any actual launch.